Celtics

With six consecutive seasons of amazing playoff performances, since the Big Three comprising Paul Pierce, Rajon Rondo, and Kevin Garnett was created by the Boston Celtics, the team has failed to pass even through the first round of the playoffs. After some good performances in the previous years, this has been the team’s earliest exit ever from the playoffs of the Big Three era. A large number of Boston Celtics fans and basketball enthusiasts received a big blow when their team took an unexpected beating at the hands of the Knicks. Moreover, several people who love to wager on basketball or bet on sports did not stand a chance to win either through sports betting at www.wageronsports.com or any other betting websites. Betting lines, sports odds and all online sports wagering work in the same manner. The Celtics may be a team that deserved the bet America placed on them because of their never-say-die attitude, but clearly, they have lots of work to do in the off-season.

It is time to think about what should be the next move for the Celtics for this off-season. With some of the sports experts and analysts already calling upon the team with the necessary changes that might be made for securing a seat in the playoffs next year, it is high time that the team management think out some decent plans for the next NBA season. There are certain visible options that might help the team in strengthening their position in the next season’s playoffs.

1. Trading Off

Realistically, the Boston Celtics need to trade anyone from among the 4 bench combo guards that the team acquired last year. Jason Terry, Terrence Williams, Courtney Lee and Jordan Crawford were quite unpredictable this season and did not perform well, either. Out of the four, it would be quite tough to move out Terry because of a slightly better performance during the playoffs. Terrence is a low-risk and high rewarding player, who can be trained well as a backup for the point guard position. From the remaining two, the team can move either Crawford or Lee in lieu of a good frontcourt player or a robust point guard.

2. Retain Paul Pierce

If there are any plans on retiring Pierce from the team, then those plans must be extended for some time in the light of a better future season at the NBA. With Paul clearly stating that he does not want to retire too soon, at least for a year, it rests completely upon the team management to glue his position in the team or trade him off. With Brooklyn Nets eyeing on picking up Pierce upfront, the Celtics could consider playing him for another year, aiming at getting better results in the next season.

3. Not Losing the Doc

Of all the things that Celts can do to book a seat in the next and the following year’s playoffs is not letting coach Glenn “Doc” Rivers retire or join another team. There are rumors that the Brooklyn Nets are eyeing on getting Doc Rivers on board to fill the position of their head coach. This is the place where Boston Celtics need to focus more and ensure that they do not lose the one of the best coaches in the NBA today. Though the team requires some changes in the coaching staff, it does not mean bringing in a new coach for the Celtics. Rivers joining any other NBA team or just retiring from the game would not be in the best interest of the Celts. Any other adjustments made to the team would be meaningless, if there is no Doc to guide them through.

With a bunch of things wandering in the mind of every basketball enthusiast, nothing appears to be particular or crystal clear at this moment. It would be interesting to see what changes Boston actually make to their side, with the objective of strengthening their gameplay and making it through the playoffs in the coming seasons. The changes that the Celtics may take can be as tough as the obstacles in Tough Mudder events, but it would be for the better of the organization for sure. The Boston Celtics are a team known for being competitive and having the heart of a champion. Look for them to bounce back next season—stronger, hungrier and more dangerous.

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